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Portuguese-Style Mussels with Chorizo and Beer

Portuguese-Style Mussels with Chorizo and Beer


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This is a recipe for steamed mussels that takes me back to the time I spent in Portugal a few years ago and incorporates my love for smoky chorizo and beer.

Ingredients

  • 2-3 pounds mussels
  • ½ bottle (about 6 ounces) ale, preferably Sagres if you want to be authentic
  • 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil or butter
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • ¼ pound Spanish chorizo or linguiça, sliced ¼-inch thick
  • 2 plum tomatoes, crushed (or one 15-ounce can of diced tomatoes)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley or cilantro
  • Salt, to taste
  • Crusty French bread or Portuguese rolls

Directions

Heat the olive oil and garlic in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. When the garlic is fragrant, add onion and sausage and brown, about 2-3 minutes. Add in the tomatoes and bring to a simmer; cook for about 2-3 minutes. Pour the beer and mussels into the pot. Shake to combine. Cover and bring to a boil. Simmer until the mussels have opened, about 5 minutes.

Remove from heat and discard any unopened mussels. Season to taste.

Portion out mussels in soup bowls and ladle the sauce over and down into the shells. Garnish with the fresh herbs and serve immediately with lots of crusty bread for sopping up the sauce.


Mussels with Chorizo and Beer Recipe

There's nothing like a spicy, warm, comforting meal on a cold winter night—especially one that involves cooking with your favorite ale. This mussels and chorizo recipe uses up a few cans of beer, giving this spicy recipe an extra punch of flavor. Between the chorizo, garlic, jalapeños, and the beer, you'll love cooking up this recipe this winter, courtesy of Loaves&Fishes Farm Series Cookbook: Long Ireland Beer Co. by Sybille van Kempen with Licia Kassim Householder

"Your favorite beer will lend that particular flavor to the dish complimenting sweet mussels and spicy sausage. A pint of chilled ale for each would be delicious on the side," says van Kempen.

So grab your favorite ale to sip on and dig into this spicy mussels and chorizo recipe. And if you're looking for even more recipes that use up that ale, check out our list of 14 Delicious Things You Can Make With a Can of Beer.

Serves 6


  1. Heat olive oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat until shimmering.
  2. Add in chorizo and brown on all sides.
  3. Lower heat to medium and add onions. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for 8-10 minutes, until softened.
  4. Add in garlic and jalapeno and cook, stirring, for another 2-3 minutes.
  5. Add mussels and beer, and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes, until mussels open.
  6. Cook for another minute or 2 if all mussels haven’t opened. Discard any mussels that do not open.
  7. Add butter and stir into the broth.
  8. Check seasoning, sprinkle with chopped cilantro (if using), and serve with crusty bread.

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How to Make It

  1. Heat olive oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat until shimmering.
  2. Add in chorizo and brown on all sides.
  3. Lower heat to medium and add onions. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for 8-10 minutes, until softened.
  4. Add in garlic and jalapeno and cook, stirring, for another 2-3 minutes.
  5. Add mussels and beer, and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes, until mussels open.
  6. Cook for another minute or 2 if all mussels haven't opened. Discard any mussels that do not open.
  7. Add butter and stir into the broth.
  8. Check seasoning, sprinkle with chopped cilantro (if using), and serve with crusty bread.

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Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound Mexican chorizo, sliced 1/2-inch thick on a bias
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeno, thinly sliced into rings
2 pounds Prince Edward Island mussels, cleaned, beards removed
2 14-ounce cans strong-flavored ale
4 tablespoons salted butter
1/4 cup chopped cilantro (optional)
Crusty bread, for serving


Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound Mexican chorizo, sliced 1/2-inch thick on a bias
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeno, thinly sliced into rings
2 pounds Prince Edward Island mussels, cleaned, beards removed
2 14-ounce cans strong-flavored ale
4 tablespoons salted butter
1/4 cup chopped cilantro (optional)
Crusty bread, for serving


Recipe Summary

  • 3 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large shallot, minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes
  • 2 cups dry white wine
  • 3 cups canned crushed tomatoes with juice
  • 4 ounces dried, hot chorizo, cut on the diagonal into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 2 pounds mussels, scrubbed and debearded
  • 1/3 cup coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Heat oil in a large, heavy stockpot over medium heat. Add shallot cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and red-pepper flakes cook, stirring occasionally, 3 minutes. Add wine bring to a boil. Add tomatoes and chorizo. Reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Add mussels. Cover, and continue to cook, shaking pot occasionally, until mussels open, about 10 minutes (discard any unopened ones). Add parsley toss. Serve immediately.


Steamed Mussels with Chorizo and Fennel

&ldquoFresh mussels and Spanish chorizo are essential to this smoky, Spanish dish. Buy mussels from a reliable fishmonger and store them on ice. You may need to remove the 'beard' from the mussels if they aren&rsquot cleaned already. Be sure to discard any mussels that are partially opened or broken. Larger black mussels will take a bit longer to cook than blue mussels.

Unlike ground Mexican chorizo, Spanish chorizo is cured and smoked our favorite brand is Palacios, which is available at many grocers or online. A large kitchen spider was best for fishing the cooked mussels out of the pot. If you don&rsquot have any slow-roasted tomatoes, substitute a 14 1/2&ndashounce can of fire-roasted tomatoes with juice. We liked these with crusty bread and extra virgin olive oil.

Don&rsquot fully cook the mussels on the stove. They continue to cook as they sit off heat.&rdquo &mdashChristopher Kimball in his 2018 Beard Award&ndashnominated Milk Street: The New Home Cooking

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces Spanish chorizo, halved lengthwise and sliced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 8 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 small fennel bulb, halved, cored, and thinly sliced crosswise
  • 1 small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seed
  • 16 slow-roasted tomato halves (about 1 pound), chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups dry vermouth
  • 3 pounds blue mussels, scrubbed
  • 4 tablespoons salted butter, chilled
  • 1/2 cup chopped flat leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Method

In a large pot over medium, cook the chorizo in the olive oil until the chorizo begins to brown, about 3 minutes. Stir in the garlic, fennel, onion, bay leaves, and fennel seed. Cover and cook the mixture until the onion and fennel soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes, vermouth, and 1/2 cup water, then bring the pot to a simmer. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the fennel is tender, about 7 minutes.

Add the mussels to the mixture and stir. Cover and cook until the mussels just begin to open, about 3 minutes. Off heat, let the mussels continue to cook, covered, until they open, another 3 to 5 minutes, quickly stirring once halfway through.

Using a kitchen spider or slotted spoon, transfer the mussels to a serving platter, leaving the sauce in the pot. Return the sauce to a simmer over low, then remove it from the heat. Whisk in the butter until melted. Stir in the parsley and lemon juice. Taste the sauce and season with salt and pepper. Pour the sauce over the mussels.

Adapted from Christopher Kimball&rsquos Milk Street: The New Home Cooking (Little, Brown and Company 2017). Get more from Milk Street.


1. Bring the beer and the garlic to the boil in a large, lidded pot, and simmer for 30 seconds. Add the mussels, cover tightly and simmer for one minute over high heat.

2. Give the pan a big shake. Using tongs, remove any mussels that have opened, replace the lid and simmer for another minute, taking out the mussels as they open.

3. Whisk the mustard and cream into the mussel broth, and add the parsley, dill and pepper.

4. Quickly sear the chorizo for two minutes in a frypan until browned.

5. Ladle the broth over the mussels in four warm bowls, top with the chorizo and its pan juices and serve.


Preparation

Position an oven rack about 4 inches from the broiler element and heat the broiler on high.

In a 6-quart Dutch oven, heat the remaining 2 Tbs. olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering hot. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened but not browned, about 3 minutes. Stir in the sliced garlic and cook until the edges of the onion begin to brown, about 1 minute. Stir in the smoked paprika and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, wine, chorizo, and thyme and bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Stir in the mussels, coating them with the sauce mixture. Cover and cook, stirring 2 or 3 times, until the mussels have opened, 8 to 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, arrange the baguette slices in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet and brush them with the garlic oil, dividing the bits of garlic evenly among the slices. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and then broil, rotating the baking sheet as needed, until evenly browned and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes.



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