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Ratatouille provençale recipe

Ratatouille provençale recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes
  • Ratatouille

In France, we make ratatouille all year round and serve it with white rice, or as a side dish for fish or meat.

3 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 1 glass olive oil
  • 2 large onions, quartered
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 aubergines, sliced
  • 6 courgettes, cut into 2 cm slices
  • 1kg tomatoes, quartered
  • ½ glass tomato puree (optional)
  • 3 tablespoons herbes de Provence
  • salt and pepper to taste

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:1hr ›Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Heat the oil in a large pot over high heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 2 minutes. Lower the heat and add all the other ingredients to the pot. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes.
  2. After 30 minutes, remove the lid. If there is still a lot of liquid, continue cooking for another 30 minutes uncovered. If the amount of liquid looks right, put back the lid and cook for 30 more minutes.

Tip:

My children are not very fond of the aubergine skin, so sometimes I peel them for this dish.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(10)

Reviews in English (2)

by liederlover

Very good flavour and easy to prepare. Fresh local summer vegetables make all the difference! Made as written except I didn’t add tomato purée. I did add a summer squash I had no other plans for. I also added a can of drained chickpeas for a little protein. But it would have been equally delicious without my additions. The eggplant is what really sets this dish apart. Yummy & thumbs up from this family!-18 Aug 2018

by Tammy

Made this for dinner and it was wonderful! A few hints that might be helpful: this makes A LOT! I cut the recipe in half and it still required me to use my large (14”) iron skillet to fit everything and there was still plenty. The cooking times I thought were a little long. You should simmer 15-20 min covered and then remove lid and simmer about 15 min more. I used the optional tomato pureé. Also the ingredient list includes fresh tomatoes but they are not included in the directions. Just toss them in with the eggplant and zucchini. Make sure to use Herbs de Provence! It’s what makes it taste so good! I sprinkled with Parmesan cheese to guild the Lilly!-05 Aug 2018


13 Best Recipes from Provence, France

When it comes to French cooking, the Provence region is widely considered the best place to live if you are a foodie. The cuisine there is filled with flavor and tangy sensations, that almost seem to infuse its juices with the feeling of summer.

Now, we can&rsquot all move to the south of France, but we can bring a bit of it to us. With a few traditional recipes from Provence that is!

Beyond the scenery of this part of the south of France, one of the things that draw visitors is the classic provençale food. The cuisine from this part of the world can be traced back to the ancient civilisations all along the Mediterranean.

Over the centuries, this area has seen a strong presence of the Greeks, the Romans and the Maghreb from North Africa influencing today&rsquos provençale french cuisine to feature plenty of olive oil, garlic, and aromatic herbs from the classic French pantry.

Now there is a bit of confusion over what exactly is Provençale, (I admit I got confused as well!) When we think of Provence and Côte d&rsquoAzur (aka the French Riviera), we tend to think of two different things. One conjures up ideas of lavender fields and the other sun-filled boardwalks along the sea.

There is a reason for this, Provence and Côte d&rsquoAzur used to be two different regions in France.

However since 1960, this has all been turned into one region called Provence-Alpes-Côte d&rsquoAzur or Région PACA if you want to sound like a hip local. With Avignon and Marseille on one side, and Nice and St. Tropez on the other, this large southern region includes it all.

And with that, there are a lot of french provençale recipes that you can try at home, that are quite easy to make. My husband&rsquos family is from Provence so I&rsquove been lucky enough to spend a lot of time there tasting, testing, and noting my favorites.

And we shouldn&rsquot forget about the wine. While the Côtes du Rhône and Côtes de Provence are not the most prestigious of the French wine regions, there is some good wine coming from this area.

Whether you&rsquore into the classics, or looking for more interesting options, I&rsquove put together my list of favorite provençale foods, along with some popular wine and apéritif suggestions for each dish. Bon appétit!


Recipe Summary

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 ½ cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pound tomatoes, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 eggplant, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • ¼ cup tomato sauce
  • 1 ½ tablespoons herbes de Provence
  • salt and cracked black pepper to taste
  • ¼ cup dry red wine
  • 2 large red bell pepper, halved lengthwise and seeded
  • 1 cup shredded Italian cheese blend, divided
  • Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish
  • 1 pinch cracked black pepper

Pour olive oil into a large pot over high heat. Add onion and garlic and saute for 2 minutes. Reduce heat and add tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini, bell pepper, tomato sauce, herbes de Provence, salt, and pepper. Stir in wine, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Uncover and simmer until vegetables are just tender, 12 to 15 minutes. Leave ratatouille warm in the pot until ready to use.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Arrange pepper halves, cut-sides down, in a 2-quart baking dish.

Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes.

Turn peppers so cut sides face up. Mix 2 cups ratatouille with 1/2 cup Italian cheese blend spoon into pepper halves. Cover loosely with foil and bake until peppers are tender and filling is heated through, about 25 minutes.

Uncover peppers sprinkle with remaining cheese. Continue baking until cheese is melted, about 5 minutes more. Garnish with parsley and top with black pepper.


Vegetarian Ratatouille Provençale Recipe

The word ratatouille comes from touiller, which means ‘to stir round or mix’, and the recipe originates from Nice in the South of France. “For me, this dish not only represents but also encompasses the splendour of the South: full of sunshine, colour and the scent of the Mediterranean,” says Michelin-starred chef Daniel Galmiche.

Chef’s Tip: A lovely way to use up any leftover ratatouille is to mix it with rice and then stuff tomatoes, which you have deseeded, and bake them in the oven at 180°C/350°F/gas 4 for 25–30 minutes. Or for a quick snack, top pieces of toasted baguette or a rustic loaf, such as pain de campagne, with cold ratatouille. Delicious.

Vegetarian Ratatouille Provençale

Preparation: 20 minutes, plus cooking the rice and pasta

Cooking time: 2 hours 10 minutes

100ml/3½fl oz/scant ½ cup olive oil
1 aubergine, peeled and cut into large cubes
1 onion, chopped
4 garlic cloves, crushed
1 red pepper, deseeded and sliced
1 green pepper, deseeded and sliced
1 large courgette or 2 small courgettes, cubed
400g/14oz tomatoes, peeled, deseeded and cut into large cubes
a pinch of caster sugar
1 bouquet garni made with 1 small handful of flat-leaf parsley sprigs and 1 sprig of thyme, tied together with kitchen string
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper (optional)
a small handful of basil leaves, to serve
rice or pasta, to serve

1. In a large cast iron pan, heat the oil over a medium heat. Add the aubergine and cook for 4–5 minutes until softened but not coloured. Add the onion, garlic and peppers and cook for 2–3 minutes, stirring occasionally, then stir in the courgette, tomatoes and sugar. Add the bouquet garni and simmer gently, partially covered, over a low to medium heat, for 1½-2 hours, stirring occasionally. If, when you take the lid off the ratatouille, it is too wet due to condensation, continue cooking it gently with the lid off, until you get the texture and consistency you want.
2. When ready, check the seasoning and add some salt and pepper, if necessary. Sprinkle with basil and serve with rice or pasta.

In his book French Brasserie Cookbook, top chef Daniel Galmiche brings you a superb collection of 100 classic brasserie recipes with a modern Mediterranean twist. Daniel gives us irresistible recipes for starters, mains, side dishes and desserts – all based on the classic principles that characterise brasserie cooking: regional recipes, local ingredients and homely, comforting flavours.

‘Daniel Galmiche creates easy, modern food that is full of flavour and character’Heston Blumenthal


Ratatouille provençale recipe - Recipes

1. Cut eggplant into 2" cubes and place in colander

2. Quarter lengthwise the zucchini and summer squash, then cut into 2" pieces and place in same colander. Sprinkle generously with salt, and leave to drain in sink for at least ½ hour. The salt will draw out any bitterness along with excess moisture. Rinse vegetables and leave to drain dry.

3. Heat large pan, deep skillet or Dutch oven. Add oil, then add onions and garlic and cook for 3-4 minutes over medium heat until just softening, but not browning.

4. Add drained zucchini, eggplant and summer squash and cook for about 5 minutes on medium heat. The vegetables need to be frying not steaming, and browning slightly.

5. Add peppers and cook for 3 minutes.

6. Skin the tomatoes by putting them in a bowl of boiling water for 1 minute, then drop into cold water, remove skin, quarter and remove seeds.

7. Add crushed tomatoes, basil and thyme to pan, season lightly with salt and pepper.

8. Cook gently with lid on for ½ hour then remove lid and cook for another 30 minutes to 1 hour until vegetables are tender, liquid is reduced but the vegetables are still recognizable.

9. You could also cook this in the oven with or without a lid for a more concentrated flavor.

NOTE: don't cut back on the oil, it really is very important for the final flavor. Store in the fridge. Serve hot, cold or warm as a side dish or salad. Add a variety of beans for a vegetarian meal.

Cut slices of French bread and broil, topping with ratatouille as an appetizer. Fill an omelet with ratatouille serve over pasta with cooked, sliced chicken. Eat on its own with fresh, crusty bread. There is no need to stick to above quantities, this recipe is not written in stone. There are as many recipes for Ratatouille as for meat loaf, so don't worry if you don't have identical quantities. Add lots of fresh chopped herbs just prior to serving. Put ratatouille in 9" pie plate to heat and break fresh eggs into hollows and bake until eggs are set.


Ratatouille provençale recipe - Recipes


This famous preparation is world renown and has equally delicious cousins throughout the Mediterranean. Even though many people claim that ratatouille is the quintessential Provençal dish, it is not even listed among the 1,123 recipes in J. B. Reboul’s classic Provençal cookbook from the late nineteenth century, La cuisiniére Provençale . Ratatouille is actually a relatively modern invention, one that could not occur until the tomato came from the New World. Marimar Torres, author of The Catalan Country Kitchen , claims that ratatouille has a connection with samfaina , a kind of fried vegetable ragout, of Catalonia dating back to when Provence was linked politically with Catalonia and Aragon. In any case, throughout the Mediterranean, whenever a regional cuisine attempts to describe its local vegetable ragout, it invariably is described as a “ratatouille.” In French military slang rata , shortened from ratatouille, means a rough stew, the way it should be.

There are many ways of cooking a ratatouille, attested to by the fact that there seems not to be a cookbook that doesn’t proffer ratatouille or an American food magazine that doesn’t present a recipe for it once a month. This recipe is one of the easier ways, but an even better result will occur if you have the time to cook the vegetables separately and then mix them at the end.

Yield: Makes 6 servings
Preparation Time: 1:45 hours

1. Lay the eggplant cubes on some paper towels and sprinkle with salt. Leave them to drain of their bitter juices for 30 minutes then pat dry with paper towels.

2. In a large skillet or casserole, heat the olive oil over medium heat, then cook the onions until translucent, about 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the eggplant, tomatoes, zucchini, peppers, and garlic and shake or stir gently. Add the herbes de Provence , season with salt and pepper, and stir to mix. Cover and simmer over a medium-low heat until much of the liquid is evaporated and the vegetables tender, about 45 minutes to 1 hour, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. Strain away any remaining liquid and serve at room temperature with bread.

Variation: In step 2, cook each vegetable one after the other, adding more olive oil when required, and mix all the vegetables once they are cooked.


Ingredients

• 1 yellow courgette • 1 green courgette • 1 onion • 1 red pepper • 1 large aubergine • 4 Roma tomatoes • 1 can of chopped tomatoes • 2 cloves of garlic • fresh thyme, basil and parsley • 1/2 chilli pepper • 2 tsp Herbes à la Provençale (Herbes de Provence) • 2 tbsp Bake & Fry Olive Oil • knob of butter • Fleur de Sel (salt flakes) • Black Pepper mill • a dash of Balsamico di Modena IGP (balsamic vinegar) • 1 tsp brown sugar


Ratatouille

1. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet with a lid, then gently soften the onion in the oil. Add the peppers and brinjal and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in the baby marrows. Add the tomatoes, rosemary and thyme, and a little seasoning.

2. Cover tightly and simmer for 30 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender but in good shape. Discard the rosemary and thyme, then add the remaining herbs and garlic and cook uncovered for 5 minutes. Season to taste. Serve warm, at room temperature or cold. Drizzle with olive oil if you like.

Cook's note: One of my favourite French classics, this Provençale vegetable stew originates in Nice. This is good with a chunk of baguette. Or spooned over chickpea pasta and sprinkled with Parmesan.

Photographs: Toby Murphy
Production: Brita Du Plessis
Food assistant: Nicola Naude

Recipe by: Phillippa Cheifitz View all recipes

Regular TASTE contributor Phillippa is a well-known South African author and food writer, and has won many awards, both for her magazine features and her cookbooks.


Ratatouille provençale recipe - Recipes


This famous preparation is world renown and has equally delicious cousins throughout the Mediterranean. Even though many people claim that ratatouille is the quintessential Provençal dish, it is not even listed among the 1,123 recipes in J. B. Reboul’s classic Provençal cookbook from the late nineteenth century, La cuisiniére Provençale . Ratatouille is actually a relatively modern invention, one that could not occur until the tomato came from the New World. Marimar Torres, author of The Catalan Country Kitchen , claims that ratatouille has a connection with samfaina , a kind of fried vegetable ragout, of Catalonia dating back to when Provence was linked politically with Catalonia and Aragon. In any case, throughout the Mediterranean, whenever a regional cuisine attempts to describe its local vegetable ragout, it invariably is described as a “ratatouille.” In French military slang rata , shortened from ratatouille, means a rough stew, the way it should be.

There are many ways of cooking a ratatouille, attested to by the fact that there seems not to be a cookbook that doesn’t proffer ratatouille or an American food magazine that doesn’t present a recipe for it once a month. This recipe is one of the easier ways, but an even better result will occur if you have the time to cook the vegetables separately and then mix them at the end.

Yield: Makes 6 servings
Preparation Time: 1:45 hours

1. Lay the eggplant cubes on some paper towels and sprinkle with salt. Leave them to drain of their bitter juices for 30 minutes then pat dry with paper towels.

2. In a large skillet or casserole, heat the olive oil over medium heat, then cook the onions until translucent, about 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the eggplant, tomatoes, zucchini, peppers, and garlic and shake or stir gently. Add the herbes de Provence , season with salt and pepper, and stir to mix. Cover and simmer over a medium-low heat until much of the liquid is evaporated and the vegetables tender, about 45 minutes to 1 hour, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. Strain away any remaining liquid and serve at room temperature with bread.

Variation: In step 2, cook each vegetable one after the other, adding more olive oil when required, and mix all the vegetables once they are cooked.


Ratatouille: Step by Step

I start by salting the eggplant and squash and letting them stand in a strainer set over a bowl for between 15 and 30 minutes.

Whether doing the individually cooked or the one-pot approach, I then sweat onion and garlic in olive oil. For the one-pot approach, the next step is to combine everything else in the pot and let it cook until done.

For the individually cooked approach, as each vegetable finishes cooking, I transfer it to a baking sheet to cool slightly. Spreading the pieces in a thin, even layer allows them to cool more evenly.

I repeat this with the remaining ingredients.

As each finishes, I scrape whatever is currently on the baking sheet into a pot and spread the next vegetable on the sheet to cool a little.

Once everything is in the pot, I set it over low heat and add the tomato.

I also add herbs at this point here, it's a bundle of basil, parsley, and thyme.

Herb garnishes are up to you, too. In these photos, I've stirred in some chopped parsley, but you could use basil, another herb, or just leave it out altogether. I'll often also stir in a bit more fresh olive oil for flavor at the end.

When it's all done, there actually is one point on which I maintain my religious feelings: As good as ratatouille is hot, it's so, so much better when eaten slightly chilled or at room temperature the next day.



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